Lenovo to Benefit from the PRC’s Indigenous Tech Ultimatum. Will Democratic Countries Respond?  

Early this morning, Bloomberg reported, “China has ordered central government agencies and state-backed corporations to replace foreign-branded personal computers with domestic alternatives.” The directive, claims Bloomberg, is consistent with China’s “sweeping effort to reduce its dependence on geopolitical rivals such as the U.S. for everything from semiconductors to servers and phones.” Lenovo Consolidates Chinese Market and Continues to Sell to States – Despite Military Bans   Lenovo, the global PC manufacturer partly owned/controlled by the Chinese government, will profit most from the ban as the central government replaces 50+ million PCs, with many more sales to come from provincial governments. Ironically, the Bloomberg report speculated that Beijing is concerned about security, yet the State Department, Department of Homeland Security, and… Read More

Lenovo Appears to Still Be Selling Technology to Russia. That Should Warrant U.S. Scrutiny

Following pleas from the Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister to stop supplying Russia, Taiwanese PC maker ASUS announced this week that it has ceased shipments and will abide by “all international regulations.” The same cannot be said of China’s Lenovo, the world’s largest personal computer manufacturer—at least not with certainty. Despite reports that Lenovo stopped sales in Russia, other media reporting suggests that the company—which controls 18.5% of the Russian PC market (compared to ASUS’ 15.6%)—continues to do business there. Lenovo has not offered an official statement of whether it is maintaining its operations in Russia. “Xi Jinping’s role in Ukraine is far less visible than Vladimir Putin’s, but make no mistake: China is also a combatant in the war,” Gordon… Read More

Heritage Foundation Report Exposes the CCP’s Self-Dealing and Authoritarian Push at the International Telecommunications Union  

The International Telecommunications Union isn’t well-known, but it’s one of the most important multilateral bodies in the world. The ITU is the forum in which nations come together to set technological standards which govern the global telecommunications ecosystem – including the internet. Rules set at the ITU are what allow digital technologies to function across borders on everything from cell phone signals to satellites. But just as it has done at another UN agency, the International Civil Aviation Organization, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is using its leadership at the ITU to advance its own agenda – not constructively engage with all technological stakeholders to produce rules designed to serve all nations well. As a report released this week by… Read More